Biosecurity

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  • In agriculture, biosecurity usually refers to efforts to protect food crops or livestock from pests, invasive species, and infectious disease.
  • In national security, biosecurity usually refers to preventing theft, diversion, or deliberate malicious use of biological knowledge. materials or technologies.
  • In many non-English languages, biosecurity is not commonly distinguished from biosafety, or is seen as a sub-category of it.
  • Within the effective altruism community, the Open Philanthropy cause report defined biosecurity has been characterized as primarily covering "a wide range of risks, including natural pandemics, bioterrorism"natural pandemics", "bioterrorism and the intentional deployment of biological weapons, dualweapons", and "dual use research and the possibility of accidental deployment of biological agents." (Open Philanthropy 2020)

Bibliography

Open Philanthropy (2014) Biosecurity, Open Philanthropy, January.

  • In agriculture, "biosecurity"biosecurity usually refers to efforts to protect food crops or livestock from pests, invasive species, and infectious disease.
  • In national security, "biosecurity" isbiosecurity usually refers to preventing theft, diversion, or deliberate malicious use of biological knowledge, skills, materials,knowledge. materials or technologies.
  • In many non-English languages, no distinctionbiosecurity is not commonly made between "biosecurity" and "biosafety".distinguished from biosafety, or is seen as a sub-category of it.
  • Within the effective altruism community, the Open Philanthropy cause report defined biosecurity as covering "a wide range of risks, including natural pandemics, bioterrorism and the intentional deployment of biological weapons, dual use research and the possibility of accidental deployment of biological agents."
  • In agriculture, "biosecurity" usually refers to efforts to protect food crops or livestock from pests, invasive species, and infectious disease.
  • In national security, "biosecurity" is focused on risks from bioweapons, and usually refers to preventing theft, diversion, or deliberate malicious use of biological knowledge, skills, materials, or technologies.
  • In many non-English languages, no distinction is commonly made between "biosecurity" and "biosafety".
  • Within the effective altruism community, the Open Philanthropy cause report defined biosecurity as covering "a wide range of risks, including natural pandemics, bioterrorism and the intentional deployment of biological weapons, dual use research and the possibility of accidental deployment of biological agents."

Biosecurity iscovers the set ofprocedures, practices or other measures aimed at preventing the introductionused to manage risks from biological organisms (e.g. viruses, bacteria) or spread of harmful organismstheir products (e.g. toxins).

The term has different meanings in different contexts. As a few examples:

  • In agriculture, "biosecurity" usually refers to animalsefforts to protect food crops or livestock from pests, invasive species, and plants, in order to reduce the risk of transmission of infectious disease.

  • In national security, "biosecurity" is focused on risks from bioweapons, and usually refers to preventing theft, diversion, or deliberate malicious use of biological knowledge, skills, materials, or technologies.
  • In many non-English languages, no distinction is commonly made between "biosecurity" and "biosafety".
  • Within the effective altruism community, the Open Philanthropy cause report defined biosecurity as covering "a wide range of risks, including natural pandemics, bioterrorism and the intentional deployment of biological weapons, dual use research and the possibility of accidental deployment of biological agents."
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