Civilizational collapse

Applied to 2021 ALLFED Highlights by AronM at 17d

Aird, Michael (2020a) Collection of sources that seem very relevant to the topic of civilizational collapse and/or recovery., Effective Altruism Forum, February 24.
Many additional resources on this topic.

In Toby Ord's typology, unrecoverable civilizational collapses constitute one of the three main types of existential catastrophe (Ord 2020).

In Toby Ord's typology, unrecoverable civilizational collapses constitute one of the three main types of existential catastrophe.

Aird, Michael (2020b) Civilization re-emerging after a catastrophic collapse, Effective altruism forumAltruism Forum, June 27.

A civilizational collapse (sometimes referred to as social collapse or societal collapse) is a  drastic decrease in human population size, or in political, economic or social complexity, across essentially the entire world, for an extended period of time. Civilizational resilience is humanity's capacity to resist, or recover from, civilizational collapse.

A civilizational collapse (sometimes referred to as social collapse or societal collapse) is a rapid and significant decline drastic decrease in science and technology, culture andhuman population size, or in political, economic or social cohesion.complexity, across essentially the entire world, for an extended time. Civilizational resilience is humanity's capacity to resist, or recover from, civilizational collapse.

Wiblin, Robert & Keiran Harris (2019) Should we leave a helpful message for future civilizations, just in case humanity dies out?, 80,000 Hours, August 5.
An interview with Paul Christiano.

A civilizational collapse (sometimes referred to as social collapse or societal collapse) is a rapid and significant decline in science and technology, culture and social cohesion. Civilizational resilience is humanity's capacity to resist, or recover fromfrom, civilizational collapse.

Cotton-Barratt, Owen, Max Daniel & Anders Sandberg (2020) Defence in depth against human extinction: prevention, response, resilience, and why they all matter, Global Policy, vol. 11, pp. 271–282.

A civilizational collapse (sometimes referred to as social collapse or societal collapse) is a rapid and significant decline in science and technology, culture and social cohesion. Risks of civilizational collapse are sometimes called C-risks (Pawntoe4 2020). Civilizational resilience is humanity's capacity to recover from civilizational collapse.

Pawntoe4 (2020) On collapse risk (C-risk), Effective Altruism Forum, January 2.

Civilizational resilience is humanity's capacity to recover from civilizational collapse.

I expect many people would use that term to also include civilisation's capacity to withstand shocks without collapsing in the first place. To quickly check, I googled the term, chose one of the links at random, and indeed slide 5 has a more inclusive definition of resilience.

4Pablo7moThanks. I've edited the sentence. In the future, we may want to note explicitly that sometimes, especially in EA circles, 'resilience' is used narrowly to include only humanity's capacity to recover from, rather than to resist, civilizational collapse (or global catastrophes more generally). See footnote 2 in Cotton-Barratt, Daniel & Sandberg 2020.