Aging research

May I ask for the reasoning for the title being "Aging research" as opposed to "Anti-aging research"? 

I must assume it's because the former is the name established in the academic literature? Or is it to maintain some kind of fact/value distinction? 

Thanks in advance!

5Pablo2mo
My impression was that, as you say, "Aging research" is the more established name for the field. Moreover, the general form we've been using for articles about research on specific areas is "[Area] research". By contrast, "Anti-aging research" seems to emphasize the purpose of the research rather than the research area. Could you elaborate on why you think "Anti-aging research" is preferable (if this is in fact what you think)?
5Stefan_Schubert2mo
I guess they think that the purpose of the research is to slow aging, and that the name should make that clear. (Cf the question: "Or is it to maintain some kind of fact/value distinction? ) But I would probably disagree with that rationale. E.g. even though the purpose of research on cancer is to prevent cancer, it's called "cancer research", not "anti-cancer research". Analogously, I think that "aging research" is preferable to "anti-aging research".
3Azure2mo
I didn't really have a preference to be honest! I was just curious and a little confused by the fact that some posts and one of the "further reading links" used the "anti-aging" terminology. Thank you for point about the general format being "[Area] research" - that makes sense and will be useful to me for potential future wiki edits. Also thank you to the other comment for the "cancer research" analogy - that makes sense too. Is it worth updating the style guide for the "[Area] research" convention or is it too niche and may add unnecessary bloat?
3Pablo2mo
Good point. I weakly lean towards not updating it, since there are only a handful of articles that fit that template. But if you or others think this should be included, just let me know.
3Azure2mo
Thanks for your help and guidance. I agree that for now it's not worth it!
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Branwen, Branwen (2015) Life extension cost-benefits, Gwern.net, June 1 (updated 26 October 2018).

Aging research is research aimed at slowing down the aging process or mitigate its consequences.at repairing the damage caused by it. At present, comparatively few resources are spent on aging research, relative to the benefits that breakthroughs in this area could bring about. For example, in 2019 the National Institutes of Health spent less than two percent of its budget on aging.[1]

Aging research is research aimed at curing or slowing down the physical consequences of aging, which are the root cause of most diseases and suffering associated with ill-health.aging process or mitigate its consequences. At present, comparatively few resources are spent on anti-aging research, relative to the benefits that breakthroughs in this area could bring about. For example, in 2019 the National Institutes of Health spent less than two percent of its budget on aging.[1]

There is some disagreement concerning the best way to make progress on anti-aging. Some researchers claim that progress depends crucially on improving our knowledge of the metabolic pathways involved in the aging process—this is the approach favored by most research institutions. An alternative approach seeks to find ways to periodically repair the cellular and molecular damage caused by aging, without necessarily understanding the aging process itself. The SENS Research Foundation, an organization explicitly set up with the aim of ultimately ending aging, has pioneered this alternative approach.[2]

Bostrom, Nick (2005)Barnett, Matthew (2020) The fableEffects of anti-aging research on the dragon-tyrantlong-term future, JournalEffective Altruism Forum, February 27.

Beckstead, Nick (2017) Mechanisms of Medical EthicsAging, Open Philanthropy, vol. 31, pp. 273-277.
September.

Branwen, Branwen (2015) Life extension cost-benefits, An engaging story that seeks to highlight the importance of ending aging.Gwern.net, June 1 (updated 26 October 2018).

Anti-agingAging research is research aimed at curing or slowing down the physical consequences of aging, which are the root cause of most diseases and suffering associated with ill-health. At present, comparatively few resources are spent on anti-aging research, relative to the benefits that breakthroughs in this area could bring about. For example, in 2019 the National Institutes of Health spent less than two percent of its budget on aging.[1]

Bostrom, Nick (2005) The fable of the dragon-tyrant, Journal of Medical Ethics, 31(5),vol. 31, pp. 273-277.
An engaging story that seeks to highlight the importance of ending aging.

Anti-aging research is research aimed at curing or slowing down the physical consequences of aging, which are the root cause of most diseases and suffering associated with ill-health. At present, comparatively few resources are spent on anti-aging research, relative to the benefits that breakthroughs in this area could bring about. For example, in 2019 the National Institutes of Health spent less than two percent of its budget on aging (National Institutes of Health 2020).aging.[1]

There is some disagreement concerning the best way to make progress on anti-aging. Some researchers claim that progress depends crucially on improving our knowledge of the metabolic pathways involved in the aging process—this is the approach favored by most research institutions. An alternative approach seeks to find ways to periodically repair the cellular and molecular damage caused by aging, without necessarily understanding the aging process itself. The SENS Research Foundation, an organization explicitly set up with the aim of ending aging, has pioneered this alternative approach (De Grey & Rae 2007).approach.[2]

BibliographyFurther reading

Related entries

De Grey, Aubrey & Michael Rae (2007) Ending Aging: The Rejuvenation Breakthroughs That Could Reverse Human Aging in Our Lifetimetranshumanism, New York: St. Martin’s Press.

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    National Institutes of Health (2020) Estimates of funding for various research, condition, and disease categories (RCDC), February 24.

    Related entries

  2. ^

    De Grey, Aubrey & Michael Rae (2007) transhumanismEnding Aging: The Rejuvenation Breakthroughs That Could Reverse Human Aging in Our Lifetime, New York: St. Martin’s Press.