Center for Election Science

EvaluationFunding

As of June 2022, CES has received over $2.4 million in grants from Open Philanthropy.[5][6]

CES was involved in successful campaigns to help pass approval voting in the cities of Fargo, North Dakota and St. Louis, Missouri.[1][2] In November 2021, CES launched a campaign to get approval voting adopted in Seattle, Washington in the November 2022 election.[3] As of June 2022, the campaign has gathered the signatures necessary to include a ballot initiative on the November ballot.[4]

CES has received over $2.4 million in grants from Open Philanthropy.[4]5][5]6]

  1. ^
  2. ^

    Rakich, Nathaniel (2021) In St. Louis, voters will get to vote for as many candidates as they want, FiveThirtyEight, March 1.

  3. ^

    Piel, Michael (2021) The new frontier: Seattle approves launches a ballot initiative campaign, The Center for Election Science, November 17.

  4. ^

    Raleigh, Chris (2022) Congratulations Seattle Approves: Approval voting measure qualifies for city ballot this fall, The Center for Election Science, June 16.

  5. ^

    Open Philanthropy (2017) The Center for Election Science — General support (2017), Open Philanthropy, December.

  6. ^

    Open Philanthropy (2019) The Center for Election Science — General support (2019), Open Philanthropy, February.

CES was involved in successful campaigns to help pass approval voting in the cities of Fargo, North Dakota and St. Louis, Missouri.[1][2] In November 2021, CES launched a campaigningcampaign to get approval voting adopted in Seattle, Washington in the November 2022 election.[3]

Further reading

Wiblin, Robert & Keiran Harris (2018) Politics is so much worse because we use an atrocious 18th century voting system. Aaron Hamlin has a viable plan to fix it, 80,000 Hours, May 31.

CES has received over $2.4 million in grants from Open Philanthropy (Open Philanthropy 2017; Open Philanthropy 2019).[4][5]

CES was involved in successful campaigns to help pass approval voting in the cities of Fargo, North Dakota and St. Louis, Missouri (Piper 2018; Rakich 2021).Missouri.[1][2] In November 2021, CES launched a campaigning to get approval voting adopted in Seattle, Washington in the November 2022 election (Piel 2021).election.[3]

CES has received over $2.4 million in grants from Open Philanthropy (Open Philanthropy 2017; Open Philanthropy 2019).[4][5]

BibliographyExternal links

Open Philanthropy (2017) The Center for Election Science — General support (2017), Open Philanthropy, December.. Official Website.

Related entries

Open Philanthropy (2019) The Center for Election Science — General support (2019)electoral politics, Open Philanthropy, February. | electoral reform | United States policy and politics

Piel, Michael (2021)

  1. The new frontier: Seattle approves launches a ballot initiative campaign^, The Center for Election Science, November 17.

  2. ^

    Rakich, Nathaniel (2021) In St. Louis, voters will get to vote for as many candidates as they want, FiveThirtyEight, March 1.

    External links

  3. ^

    Piel, Michael (2021) The new frontier: Seattle approves launches a ballot initiative campaign, The Center for Election Science, November 17.

  4. ^. Official Website.

    Open Philanthropy (2017) The Center for Election Science — General support (2017), Open Philanthropy, December.

    Related entries

  5. ^

CES has received over $2.4 million in grants from Open Philanthropy (Open Philanthropy 2017; Open Philanthropy 2019). 

Evaluation

Activities

CES has received over $2.4 million in grants from Open Philanthropy (Open Philanthropy 2017; Open Philanthropy 2019). The organization was involved in successful campaigns to help pass approval voting in the cities of Fargo, North Dakota and St. Louis, Missouri (Piper 2018; Rakich 2021). Both campaigns were successful. In November 2021, CES launched a campaigning to get approval voting adopted in Seattle, Washington in the November 2022 election (Piel 2021).

Evaluation

CES has received over $2.4 million in grants from Open Philanthropy (Open Philanthropy 2017; Open Philanthropy 2019). 

The Center for Election Science (CES) is a nonprofit organization that campaigns for electoral reform in the United States. They advocateIt advocates cardinal voting methods, with an emphasis on approval voting.

Evaluation

CES has received over $2.4 million in grants from Open Philanthropy (Open Philanthropy 2017; Open Philanthropy 2019). The organization was involved in campaigns to help pass approval voting in the cities of Fargo, North Dakota and St. Louis, Missouri (Piper 2018; Rakich 2021). Both campaigns were successful. In November 2021, CES launched a campaigning to get approval voting adopted in Seattle, Washington in the November 2022 election (Piel 2021).

Bibliography

Open Philanthropy (2017) The Center for Election Science — General support (2017), Open Philanthropy, December.

Open Philanthropy (2019) The Center for Election Science — General support (2019), Open Philanthropy, February.

Piel, Michael (2021) The new frontier: Seattle approves launches a ballot initiative campaign, The Center for Election Science, November 17.

Piper, Kelsey (2018) This city just approved a new election system never tried before in America, Vox, November 15.

Rakich, Nathaniel (2021) In St. Louis, voters will get to vote for as many candidates as they want, FiveThirtyEight, March 1.

electoral politics | electoral reform | United States policy and politics

The Center for Election Science (CES) is a nonprofit organization that campaigns for electoral reform in the United States. They advocate cardinal voting methods, with an emphasis on approval voting.

External links

Center for Election Science. Official Website.