Dispensers for Safe Water

In 2022, GiveWell made a major update in their assessment of water quality interventions. The update was prompted by preliminary results from a meta-analysis of mortality data from randomized controlled trials of water quality interventions conducted by Michael Kremer's team. Based on these results, GiveWell now estimates the mortality reduction in young children attributable to those interventions to be 14%, an increase of 11 percentage points from their previous estimate. In line with this update, GiveWell now considers Dispensers for Safe Water to be four to eight-timeeight times as cost-effective as unconditional cash transfers. The re-evaluation also prompted GiveWell to recommend a grant of up to $64.7 million for the organization in January 2022. GiveWell also speculates that Dispensers for Safe Water or similar programs could use $350 million per year globally at equal cost-effectiveness.[2]

In 2022, GiveWell made a major update in their assessment of water quality interventions. The update was prompted by preliminary results from a meta-analysis of mortality data from randomized controlled trials of water quality interventions conducted by Michael Kremer's team. Based on these results, GiveWell now estimates the mortality reduction in young children attributable to those interventions to be 14%, an increase of 11 percentage points from their previous estimate. In line with this update, GiveWell now considers Dispensers for Safe Water to be four to eight-time as cost-effective as unconditional cash transfers. The re-evaluation also prompted GiveWell to recommend a grant of up to $64.7 million for the organization in January 2022. GiveWell also speculates that Dispensers for Safe Water or similar programs could use $350 million per year globally at equal cost-effectiveness.[2]

In 2022, GiveWell made a major update in their assessment of water quality interventions. The update was prompted by preliminary results from a meta-analysis of mortality data from randomized controlled trials of water quality interventions conducted by Michael Kremer's team. Based on these results, GiveWell now estimates the mortality reduction in young children attributable to those interventions to be 14%, an increase of 11 percentage points from their previous estimate. In line with this update, GiveWell now considers Dispensers for Safe Water to be four to eight-time as cost-effective as unconditional cash transfers. The re-evaluation also prompted GiveWell to recommend a grant of up to $64.7 million for the organization in January 2022.[2]

Kaplan, Miranda (2022) A major update in our assessment of water quality interventions, The GiveWell Blog, April 6.

  1. ^

    GiveWell (2017) Evidence Action’s Dispensers for Safe Water program, GiveWell, November.

  2. ^

    Kaplan, Miranda (2022) A major update in our assessment of water quality interventions, The GiveWell Blog, April 6.

A review by GiveWell found strong evidence for the effects of chlorination in reducing most diarrhea-causing microorganisms, but weaker evidence for a causal link between water chlorination programs and reductions in diarrhea and death among young children.[1]  GiveWell estimates that the Dispensers for Safe Water program is in the same cost-effectiveness range as unconditional cash transfer programs.[1] Dispensers for Safe Water has beenwas a GiveWell standout charity from 2017 to 2021, when that designation was discontinued.

Further reading

GiveWell (2017) Evidence Action’s Dispensers for Safe Water program, GiveWell, November.

Tabart, Chelsea (2018) A conversation with Arjun Pant and Grace Morgan, GiveWell, June 20.

A review by GiveWell found strong evidence for the effects of chlorination in reducing most diarrhea-causing microorganisms, but weaker evidence for a causal link between water chlorination programs and reductions in diarrhea and death among young children.[1]  GiveWell estimates that the Dispensers for Safe Water program is in the same cost-effectiveness range as unconditional cash transfer programs.[1] Dispensers for Safe Water has been a GiveWell standout charity since 2017.from 2017 to 2021, when that designation was discontinued.

A review by GiveWell found strong evidence for the effects of chlorination in reducing most diarrhea-causing microorganisms, but weaker evidence for a causal link between water chlorination programs and reductions in diarrhea and death among young children (GiveWell 2017).children.[1]  GiveWell estimates that the Dispensers for Safe Water program is in the same cost-effectiveness range as unconditional cash transfer programs (GiveWell 2017).programs.[1] Dispensers for Safe Water has been a GiveWell standout charity since 2017.

BibliographyExternal links

Dispensers for Safe Water. Official website.

  1. ^

    GiveWell (2017) Evidence Action’s Dispensers for Safe Water program, GiveWell, November.

    External links

    Dispensers for Safe Water. Official website.

Dispensers for Safe Water is a program run by Evidence Action that provides chlorine dispensers for decontamination of drinking water to reduce diarrhea and prevent associated deaths in young children.

Evaluation

A review by GiveWell found strong evidence for the effects of chlorination in reducing most diarrhea-causing microorganisms, but weaker evidence for a causal link between water chlorination programs and reductions in diarrhea and death among young children (GiveWell 2017). GiveWell estimates that the Dispensers for Safe Water program is in the same cost-effectiveness range as unconditional cash transfer programs (GiveWell 2017). Dispensers for Safe Water has been a GiveWell standout charity since 2017.

Bibliography

GiveWell (2017) Evidence Action’s Dispensers for Safe Water program, GiveWell, November.

External links

Dispensers for Safe Water. Official website.

Created by Pablo at 1y