Lumpyproletariat

Lumpy is an undergraduate at some state college somewhere in the States. He isn't an interesting person and interesting things seldom happen to him.

Among his skills are such diverse elements as linguistic tomfoolery, procrastination, being terrible with computers yet running Linux anyway, a genial temperament and magnanimous spirit, a fairly swell necktie if he does say so himself, mounting dread, and quiet desperation.

Plays as a wizard in any table top or video game where that's an option, regardless of whether it's a [i]strong[/i] option. Has never failed a Hogwarts sorting test, of any sort or on any platform. (If you were about to say how one can't fail a sorting test . . . one surmises that you didn't make Ravenclaw.) Read The Fellowship, Two Towers, and Return of the King over the course of three sleepless days at age seven; couldn't keep down solid food after, because he'd forgotten to eat. Was really into the MBTI as a tweenager; thought it ridiculous how people said that no personality type was "better" than the others when ENTJ is clearly the most powerful. (Scored INFP, his self, but hey, one out of four isn't so bad. (However, found a better fit in INTP.)) Out of the Disney princesses Lumpy is Mulan--that is, if one is willing to trust BuzzFeed. Which, alas, one is not.

No, but seriously.

Mulan?? 0_o

If, despite this exhaustive list of traits and deeds, your burning question is left unanswered, send a missive in private. Should your quest be noble and intentions pure, it is said that Lumpyproletariat might respond in kind.

Topic Contributions

Comments

The Case for Rare Chinese Tofus

Strong upvote because I think this should be at the top of the conversation and this is what I came here to say. 

Tofu has strong negative associations for many Americans; if you want to sell something which does not taste like American tofu and doesn't have the texture of American tofu I would advise you in the strongest possible language to call it anything but tofu.

The Culture of Fear in Effective Altruism Is Much Worse than Commonly Recognized

Criticism has become so distorted from what it should be that my intention would not even be to criticize. Yet there is no way to suggest any organization could be doing anything better without it someone interpreting it as an attempt to sabotage it. It's not that I'm afraid of how others will respond. It's that so many individual actors have come to fear each other and the community itself. It's too much of a hassle to make it worthwhile to resolve the barrage of hostility from trying to contribute to anything.

I notice that the OP has gotten twenty upvotes--including one from me--, but that I myself have never encountered the phenomenon described. My experience, like D0TheMath's, is that people who offer criticism are  taken seriously. Other people in this comment section, at least so far, seem to have similar experiences.

Could some of the people who've experienced such chilling effects give more details about it? By PM if they don't anticipate as strongly as I do that the responses on the open forum will be civil and gracious?

World's First Octopus Farm - Linkpost

Oh, I'm sorry for being unclear! The second phrasing emphasizes different words (as and adult human) in a way I thought made the meaning of the original post clearer.

World's First Octopus Farm - Linkpost

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cephalopod_intelligence

I am not an expert on animal intelligence, but octopuses seem as or more intelligent than monkeys from my limited understanding. They aren't proven as intelligent as the great apes--none have been taught a human language that I know of--but might have languages of their own, and considering their other feats I would be mildly surprised if there aren't at least several species which could learn a sign language which doesn't take hands.

World's First Octopus Farm - Linkpost

Do you think the initial post would have read better as: "I think that an octopus is ~30% likely to be as morally relevant as an adult human (with wide error bars, I don't know as much about the invertebrates as I'd like to), so this is pretty horrifying to me."?

World's First Octopus Farm - Linkpost

Assuming ten pound octopi, that's ~600,000 octopi farmed and killed every year. I think that an octopus is ~30% likely to be as morally relevant as an adult human (with wide error bars, I don't know as much about the invertebrates as I'd like to), so this is pretty horrifying to me.

Why do you find the Repugnant Conclusion repugnant?

This comment seems to me to be requesting clarification in good faith. Might someone who downvoted it explain to why, if it wouldn't take too much time or effort? I'm fairly new to the forum and would like a more complete view of the customs.

Edited to add: Perhaps because it was perceived as lower effort than the parent comment, and required another high-effort post in response, which might have been avoided by a closer reading?

What is good?

Other people might link you to philosophical background reading which is assumed by most EAs. I'll just say, that even though good is a subjective thing and everyone has their own values, there is typically a significant convergence. For instance, most people will say that the world is better when fewer people suffer from preventable diseases. If you would also say that, it's worth your while to think about which courses of action reduce global disease, and work with other people who agree.

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