Renan Araujo

Researcher @ Rethink Priorities
Working (0-5 years experience)
154Joined Apr 2020
araujorenan.com

Bio

I'm Renan Araujo, a Researcher at Rethink Priorities.

I work in the General Longtermism team, where my primary focus involves making sense of how to prioritize among megaprojects and how to operationalize them. Currently (Nov 22), my work leads me to think about scalable movement building in LMIC, which I've been doing with a focus on Brazil and Latin America through Condor Camp.

Previously, I worked as a predoctoral research fellow at the Legal Priorities Project. There, I look into how constitutions protect future generations, what research should be done in space governance, and how extortion law may help reduce s-risks.

In a previous life, I considered following an academic career in criminology, did a master's in criminal justice policy at LSE, led a criminal justice reform volunteer group in Brazil, and earned a law degree.

You can reach out to me through my personal page and my LinkedIn. I'm happy to have 1-1s about various subjects, from career advice to space governance :)

Comments
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We at Condor Camp (a project for longtermist movement building in Brazil) are providing some advice for Brazilian students, feel free to reach out: info@condor.camp. I studied Law in a Brazilian university, so I have some first-hand knowledge about the Brazilian higher ed system but not about Biology exactly. My guess is that Biology degrees in Brazil can often be quite narrow, and that there might be more interesting alternatives depending on where you're located and how competitive your ENEM grades were. I recommend you reach out for a chat with one of our team members :)

Seems like great work, and I'll engage with it more in the future! But I wanted to push back a little on this excerpt:

According to Tonn (2021), only two of the 100 national constitutions he analyzed included specific provisions advocating for future generations. Constitutions could also be amended to establish new institutions, like Tonn’s proposed national anticipatory institutions (NAI), the World Court of Generations (WCG), the InterGenerational Panel on Perpetual Obligations (IPPO), or others. Please refer to his aforementioned book for more information.

You can check a paper I co-authored on the constitutionalization of future generations to see that 81 out of 196 constitutions (41%) explicitly mention future generations, with varied levels of legal protection. In short, one of our takeaways is that constitutions don't seem like a quite tractable way of protecting future generations, since many of these de jure protections don't translate into de facto actions – the latter seem to mostly be a product of other factors. I haven't read Tonn's work.

I think it'd be preferable to explicitly list as a reason for applying something along the lines of "Grantees who received funds, but want to set them aside to protect themselves from potential clawbacks". 

Less importantly, it'd possibly be better to make it separate from "to return to creditors or depositors". 

Some situations in which I appreciate light/dark switches in general:

  • It's day, but I'm in my room on my phone and it's dark.
  • It's night, but I'm in my computer with sufficient light around me.
  • I'm on the tube and it's lighter or I'm in a car and it's darker than outside. 

But I know your time is quite valuable and I don't have a good sense of how effortful it'd be to implement this, so take this suggestion as something I'd consider nice-to-have but have absolutely no strong feelings about it. 

Windows and iOS. (I now realize you asked for the OS and I read browser , sorry)

I’d switch depending on the time of day, device I’m using (phone or computer), and lighting situation, as I read the forum a lot on the go. I use Chrome and Firefox.

If possible, an easier way to change between dark/light mode, like a switch on the top right menu, would be great.  

What kind of support will be provided? E.g., meals, support for patterns to come,  leasure activities 

Exciting work! Looking forward to reading that agenda and following your next steps. 

Sounds great. As someone with no familiarity (but a lot of interest) in the field, I'd appreciate it if you included comparisons with the state of the art and existing alternatives in your analysis.

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