Ardenlk

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Some promising career ideas beyond 80,000 Hours' priority paths

Just to let you know I've revised the blurb in light of this. Thanks again!

Some history topics it might be very valuable to investigate

We also had this choice with our other problems and other paths posts, and decided against the listicle style, basically for the reasons you say. I think there is a nacent/weak norm, and think it makes sense to uphold it. The main argument against is that is actually kind of helpful to know if something is a long list or a short list -- esp if I have a small bit of time and won't want to start something long.

Some promising career ideas beyond 80,000 Hours' priority paths

Hey Michael,

Thanks (as often) for this list! I'm wondering, might you be up for putting it into a slightly more fomal standalone post or google doc that we could potentially link to from the blurb?

Really love how you're collecting resources on so many different important topics!

Some promising career ideas beyond 80,000 Hours' priority paths

Thanks for these points! Very encouraging that you can do this work from such a variety of disciplines. I'll revise the blurb in light of this.

Some promising career ideas beyond 80,000 Hours' priority paths

Interesting! I think this might fall under global priorities research, which we have as a 'priority path' -- but it's not really talked about in our profile on that, and I agree it seems like it could be a good straetgy. I'll take a look at the priority path and consider adding something about it. Thanks!

Some promising career ideas beyond 80,000 Hours' priority paths

Thanks so much Rohin for this explanation. It sounds somewhat persuasive to me, but I don't feel in a psoition to have a good judgement on the matter. I'll pass this on to our AI specialists to see what they think!

Problem areas beyond 80,000 Hours' current priorities

Hi Brian,

In general, we have a heuristic according to which issues that primarily affect people in countries like the US are less likely to be high impact for more people to focus on at the margin than issues that primiarly affect others or affect all people equally. While criminal justice does affect people in other countries as well, it seems like most of the most promising interventions are country-, and especially US-, specific -- including the interventions Open Phil recommends, like those discussed here and here. The main reason for this heuristic is that these issues are likely to be less neglected (even if they're still neglected relative to how much attention they should receive in general), and likely to affect a smaller number of people. Does that make sense?

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