Ivan Burduk

Building and supporting the EA community across NZ (and Australia).

Academic background: BE(Hons) ChemE, BSc Physics, Chemistry.

Career background: Research science & engineering, product development, project management, quality systems.

Hobbies: Perfumery (elemental-essences.com), fire-dancing, chess

Self-proclaimed generalist

Let's meet! https://calendly.com/ivan-burduk

Wiki Contributions

Comments

Why fun writing can save lives: the case for it being high impact to make EA writing entertaining

As someone with little writing experience, and a plan to write more - I found this post motivating and useful! The  "stop trying to be serious and respectable" point hit the nail on the head for me. I don't have a strong background in writing, and when I do write something I set a high internal bar for what is "serious and useful enough".

Personally, I don't see aiming to have engaging writing as an extra hoop. I find it decreases the resistance because I feel like I can write with a more authentic & natural tone. I'm more of a speaker than I am a writer, which I think tends to cause my writing to be overly verbose (as I just write what I would say). 

But this post had really useful tips for where I'm at - I'm sure I'll be referring to this several times in the near future. Thanks Kat!

I think making EA content more entertaining/engaging (or having content that achieves this e.g. submissions to the Creative Writing Contest) is a great way to spread EA ideas. The same goes for YouTube videos and other forms of media. Generally speaking, more entertaining = more engaging = more likely to spread. Not to mention that people are more likely to act when emotionally engaged rather than merely intellectually. 

Book Giveaway Impact Analysis (Doing Good Better in NZ)

That's a good suggestion, thank you. I hadn't considered that. I would feel more confident in making a suggestion to the EA infrastructure fund after we implement the improvements and do a follow up analysis. However, the EAIF wouldn't administer the books themselves - it would probably need to be done via some organization (e.g. CEA).

CEA already gives away many books through the virtual programs, so perhaps getting people onboarded onto those is a good strategy. Alternatively, groups can also apply for funding for book giveaways through CEA. 

I could see a book giveaway being offered alongside the virtual programs being potentially  valuable - but the question would be if it would have a net value increase, or if it would detract from the value of the programs (due to some percentage of people choosing the book over committing to the program, and then not actually reading the book). 

I have a feeling it is probably net positive, and could potentially be a precursor to the virtual program, as it provides more flexibility and less commitment.  But again, wider distribution seems to be more of an organization-level implementation than a particularly 'funding-constrained' issue.

Book Giveaway Impact Analysis (Doing Good Better in NZ)

Thanks Peter. 

I agree about the sample bias. Which is part of the reason why I think the data from actual donations is relevant - rather than relying on respondents self-reported figures.

Implementing a presurvey is one of the top improvements to action - as I do expect that to help a lot. If you have any particular suggestions for useful pre/post measures, I'd love to hear them. 

Appendix B is contained within the Appendices (Google Doc). 

Book Giveaway Impact Analysis (Doing Good Better in NZ)

Thanks Luke! Looking forward to getting some better data after we improve the system. I think it would be a good project for GWWC to implement. Perhaps with the larger scale you might be able to automate a few things (e.g. various follow ups) and get more out of each book.

I've just followed up about the cost. Some wires must have got crossed somewhere down the line, as it seems that the cost of book + delivery is actually $20 (so that would make the book  itself ~$15). Woops. I'll update the post with this.